Category Archives: Uncategorized

N. Helberger in gesprek met M. de Goede in SPUI25 Event Baanbrekend en Bekroond: topwetenschappers over hun onderzoek 19/9 from 1700-1830

De European Research Council (ERC) van de Europese Unie viert dit jaar net als SPUI25 haar tienjarig bestaan. Aanleiding om het onderzoek en de laureaten in het zonnetje te zetten. Twee van de ERC-laureaten van de UvA zijn te gast, Marieke de Goede en Natali Helberger. Onder leiding van moderator Sicco de Knegt spreken zij over hun onderzoek, de dilemma’s die ze tegenkomen en wat hen drijft als wetenschapper.In tien jaar hebben 71 onderzoekers van de UvA een subsidie van de ERC ontvangen, waarmee de UvA ‘top host organisation’ is in Nederland. In totaal heeft de ERC in tien jaar tijd bijna 7.000 onderzoekers in Europa gefinancierd. De onderzoekers aan de Nederlandse universiteiten zijn erg succesvol geweest in het verwerven van ERC-grants. In totaal gaat het in Nederland om 593 toekenningen, voor een totaalbedrag van zo’n één miljard euro. Om het tienjarige bestaan van zowel ECR als SPUI25 te vieren én in het bjizonder het succesvolle onderzoek aan de UvA nodigen we in het najaar een aantal van de UvA-laureaten uit om te vertellen over hun onderzoek.Marieke de Goede (Foto: Jeroen Oerlemans)Over de spreker

Source: Baanbrekend en Bekroond: topwetenschappers over hun onderzoek – SPUI25

Do not blame it on the algorithm at IC2S2

We presented our research on the impact of algorithmic design on diversity of the output at the 3rd International Conference on Computational Social Science in Cologne. Algorithms preform a lot better than we expected, at least when they select articles from a broadsheet newspaper.

 

New study for European Parliament about ePrivacy proposal

Together with colleagues from IViR, Frederik, published a new study, “An assessment of the Commission’s Proposal on Privacy and Electronic Communications” (by Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius, Joris van Hoboken, Ronan Fahy, Kristina Irion, and Max Rozendaal).

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, appraises the European Commission’s proposal for an ePrivacy Regulation. The study assesses whether the proposal would ensure that the right to the protection of personal data, the right to respect for private life and communications, and related rights enjoy a high standard of protection. The study also highlights the proposal’s potential benefits and drawbacks more generally. The proposed ePrivacy Regulation aims to protect privacy on the internet, and includes rules on, for instance, online tracking.

Read the full study here.

Frederik presented the preliminary results at the European Parliament. A video is available here (from 26:00 minutes on).

Earlier this year, Frederik also spoke at the European Parliament about the ePrivacy proposal, video here.

TILTing Perspectives 2017: Regulating a connected world

Researchers from the Personalised Communication project presented various papers at TILTing Perspectives 2017: Regulating a connected world, a conference organized by Tilburg University from 17-19 May. The conference brought together researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and civil society at the intersection of law and regulation, technology, and society, and provided a great opportunity to exchange ideas and make new connections.

Marijn presented a paper on mobile health apps, privacy and autonomy. Frederik chaired several panels, among which a panel on price discrimination. A paper cowritten by Bálazs, Frederik, Kristina, Judith, Natali, and Claes was presented, discussing the technological, legal, ethical, and organizational infrastructures of research into algorithmic agents. Another paper presented was written by Balázs, Judith, and Natali, and concerned the conditions under which people accept news personalization. Sarah presented her paper on how news personalization affects the right to receive information.

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How He Used Facebook to Win | by Sue Halpern | The New York Review of Books

How He Used Facebook to Win

Sue Halpern June 8, 2017

Prototype Politics: Technology-Intensive Campaigning and the Data of Democracy by Daniel Kreiss Oxford University Press, 291 pp., $99.00; $27.95 (paper)

Hacking the Electorate: How Campaigns Perceive Voters by Eitan D. Hersch Cambridge University Press, 261 pp., $80.00; $30.99 (paper)

Donald Trump; drawing by James Ferguson

Not long after Donald Trump’s surprising presidential victory, an article published in the Swiss weekly Das Magazin, and reprinted online in English by Vice, began churning through the Internet. While pundits were dissecting the collapse of Hillary Clinton’s campaign, the journalists for Das Magazin, Hannes Grassegger and Mikael Krogerus, pointed to an entirely different explanation—the work of Cambridge Analytica, a data science firm created by a British company with deep ties to the British and American defense industries.According to Grassegger and Krogerus, Cambridge Analytica had used psychological data culled from Facebook, paired with vast amounts of consumer information purchased from data-mining companies, to develop algorithms that were supposedly able to identify the psychological makeup of every voter in the American electorate. The company then developed political messages tailored to appeal to the emotions of each one. As the New York Times reporters Nicholas Confessore and Danny Hakim described it: A voter deemed neurotic might be shown a gun-rights commercial featuring burglars breaking into a home, rather than a defense of the Second Amendment; political ads warning of the dangers posed by the Islamic State could be targeted directly at voters prone to anxiety….Even more troubling was the underhanded way in which Cambridge Analytica appeared to have obtained its information. Using an Amazon site called Mechanical Turk, the company paid one hundred thousand people in the United States a dollar or two to fill out an online survey. But in order to receive payment, those people were also required to download an app that gave Cambridge Analytica access to the profiles of their unwitting Facebook friends.

Source: How He Used Facebook to Win | by Sue Halpern | The New York Review of Books

Kristina Irion talks at the National Day of Communication 2017

Kristina gave a talk on COMMUNICATION AND USER RIGHTS at the National Day of Communication congress 2017. This year it took place on the 17th of May on the campus of the University of Twente in Enschede.

At the center of all communications is the user but accounts about them vary: Are users exploited netslaves, or are they creative prosumers, or probably mixture of both? In her talk she discussed various communication users’ rights arising in the landscape of online services, such as the right to privacy, the right to be forgotten, the right to receive information, and the right not to be discriminated against. She acquainted the participants  with users who have made an entry into the story of modern communication rights. She closes with a call for respect of user rights online which ultimately benefits all, individuals, business and society at large.

national-day-of-communicationPortrait