Category Archives: scrapbook

Is the digital content bubble about to burst? For some of the publishers chasing the broadest scale, maybe » Nieman Journalism Lab

By 2017, we have found in other research that 66 percent of a sample of major European newspapers operate pay models, and prominent digital-born news publishers across the continent (including De Correspondent, El Diario, and the pioneering Mediapart) operate paid or membership models. Broadcasters generally don’t (though CNN plans to introducing digital subscriptions), but they benefit from still significant offline revenues and can treat online as a loss-leading brand extension.Most of the digital-born news publishers who have sought international expansion have neither subscribers, members, nor offline revenues to sustain their operations. They rely on digital advertising. As Jean-Christophe Potocki, general manager at HuffPost France told us: “If we don’t fight this battle, given our model, we’re dead. Diversification is to provide extra, but our model is advertising and we need to fight it directly.”Not all of these outlets will win this fight and be able to sustain itself on advertising alone (just as not every newspaper or niche news site will make pay models work). The challenges they face are clear, and include:low average revenues per user, especially with the move from desktop to mobile accelerating;the rise of programmatic advertising, widely seen as depressing CPMs for display advertising;the competition from large technology companies, most significantly Google and Facebook, that attract a large share of online advertising;the use of ad-blockers as users are frustrated by intrusive ads and long load times.

Source: Is the digital content bubble about to burst? For some of the publishers chasing the broadest scale, maybe » Nieman Journalism Lab

PC at Night of Science with presentation N. Helberger on “How to burst your filterbubble

Er zijn drie ronden waarin je minicolleges kunt volgen. In ronde twee en drie kun je er ook voor kiezen deel te nemen aan een lagerhuisdebat. Per ronde kun je je voor één onderdeel aanmelden. De keuzemogelijkheden per ronde vind je hieronder. Er wordt iedere ronde ook één college in het Engels gegeven.

Source: Ronde twee – 385 jaar UvA – Universiteit van Amsterdam

Who Filters Your News? Why we built gobo.social – Ethan Zuckerman – Medium

Gobo retrieves posts from people you follow on Twitter and Facebook and analyzes them using simple machine learning-based filters. You can set those filters — seriousness, rudeness, virality, gender and brands — to eliminate some posts from your feed. The “politics” slider works differently, “filtering in”, instead of “filtering out” — if you set the slider towards “lots of perspectives”, our “news echo” algorithm will start adding in posts from media outlets that you likely don’t read every day.

Source: Who Filters Your News? Why we built gobo.social – Ethan Zuckerman – Medium

The Automated Public Sphere by Frank Pasquale :: SSRN

Abstract The public sphere has experienced yet another structural transformation. Firms like Facebook and Google have largely automated the types of decisions made by managers at television networks, or editors at newspapers — but with much more powerful effects. Long critiqued in academic circles, the manifest inadequacy of this new media landscape is now itself a matter of public debate. The deficiencies of the automated public sphere are so manifest that consumer protection and media regulatory authoriti

Source: The Automated Public Sphere by Frank Pasquale :: SSRN

Biggest drop in Facebook organic reach we have ever seen

Facebook Explore Feed is rolling out globally this week. Most people around the world can see it in their bookmarks and they can discover new content here. But in Slovakia, Sri Lanka, Serbia, Bolivia, Guatemala and Cambodia it works differently: all posts by pages are moved from newsfeed to Explore Feed. In main newsfeed are now just friend and sponsored posts. Yes, you log into Facebook and you can see only posts from your friends and ads. You have to click on Explore Feed to see posts from pages you follo

Source: Biggest drop in Facebook organic reach we have ever seen

Publishers might have to start paying Facebook if they want anyone to see their stories – Recode

Facebook may make it harder for people to see publishers’ stories, unless those publishers pay to promote them. As part of a new test in six countries, Facebook is taking content from publishers and businesses out of its main feed. Instead, those posts will exist in a separate, hard-to-find feed that Facebook recently launched for discovering new stuff, called the “Explore Feed.”

Source: Publishers might have to start paying Facebook if they want anyone to see their stories – Recode

Twijfelen over algoritmes op de Dutch Design Week | BNR Nieuwsradio

Ondanks dat je algoritmes niet kunt vastpakken, is er wel een ‘echt’ museum. ‘Je begint met een introductiefilmpje over wat algoritmes zijn en daarna ga je door drie thema’s uit de Nederlandse geschiedenis lopen: de 18e eeuw (over slavernij en medische wetenschap), de 19e eeuw (over de strijd voor algemeen kiesrecht) en de jaren ’50, over de verzuiling en het zoeken van een katholieke huwelijkspartner’, vertelt curator Ellen Bijsterbosch bij HEMMEN op BNR. Dat lijken onderwerpen die niks te maken hebben me

Source: Twijfelen over algoritmes op de Dutch Design Week | BNR Nieuwsradio

Young subscribers flock to old media – POLITICO

As President Donald Trump wages daily war against the press, millennials are subscribing to legacy news publications in record numbers—and at a growth rate, data suggests, far outpacing any other age group.Since November’s election, the New Yorker, for instance, has seen its number of new millennial subscribers more than double from over the same period a year earlier. According to the magazine’s figures, it has 106 percent more new subscribers in the 18-34 age range and 129 percent more from 25-34.The Atlantic has a similar story: since the election, its number of new subscribers aged 18-24 jumped 130 percent for print and digital subscriptions combined over the same period a year earlier, while 18-44 went up 70 percent.Newspapers like The Washington Post and The New York Times typically do not share specific subscriber data, but according to a Post spokesperson, its subscriber growth rate is highest among millennials. A New York Times representative relayed that the paper was “seeing similar trends” in subscriptions and pointed to public data on digital traffic that showed its online reach among millennials to be up 9 percent from the same period a year ago.Even The Wall Street Journal—not a paper usually known for being left around dorm rooms—said that it has doubled its student subscribers in the last year. And a spokesperson for the famously staid Economist reported, “We are seeing that the 18-24 and 25-34 age groups have been key drivers of new subscriptions.”

Source: Young subscribers flock to old media – POLITICO